And yes, blue is the winning color 

Consumers are seeking a deeper relationship in a world where there is so much choice. And talk about choice. For example, we have a client in Illinois who has been mailing with Patient News since 2001. Luckily, early on in our relationship they decided to dominate the area by mailing wide and frequently. Now there are more than 100 dental practices within ten miles of their location leaving a market opportunity of 700 families per dentist. Yikes! Yet they’ve secured 10x this number. This client has not missed a single issue of their neighborhood newsletter in more than 12 years … would your practice pass this test?

By continuing to build and deepen the bond between their consumers and their brand through their professional and informative newsletter mailings, they will continue to win. The educational content in the newsletter is helping their consumers; it offers something meaningful which has made their brand more meaningful than their competitors. When you have a positive meaningful impact while doing your work, you will have a strong long-term ROI.

It takes consistency. “No” can really mean tell me more … according to Nancy Harhut, Chief Creative Officer at the Wilde Agency, recipient of more than 150 direct marketing effectiveness awards. People want to make sure they’re not making a mistake with spending so they are doing more research. They’re taking their time which is why it’s so important to consistently maintain your marketing awareness campaigns. Consumers are trying to learn more about us and our competitors too.

Consumers receive thousands of marketing messages per day, so it’s no wonder they’re getting selective about who they choose to engage with. And if you consider that 95% of purchase decisions are made in the subconscious*, then you’ll understand why we carefully consider human behavior when creating your direct mail campaigns. According to Harhut, there are several key steps to must-read mailings … here are a few to consider relative to your dental marketing campaign:

1.       People respect authority – a more professional presentation works, highlighting tenure and expertise

2.       People respect authority figures – include information about the doctor, their bio and lifestyle, and the practice competitive advantages

3.       Humans are naturally curious – they spend time with their mail; newsletters have 85% readership

4.       People look at who and where mail is from – use of color increases recall, recognition, and response

5.       People are inclined to touch – your newsletter and postcards are tangible and the quality will reflect your practice

6.       Eyes gravitate to certain words – free, new – people are irrationally drawn to free things – even when not normally interested

7.       No can really mean “tell me more” – continue to reinforce your message and grow your practice

8.       People are most interested in themselves – tell prospects how you will help them; provide solutions to their problems

9.       People make decisions for emotional and rational reasons – people are more motivated to avoid pain than find pleasure

10.   People feel obligated – free offers or  surprise gifts encourage people to buy from you to reciprocate

11.   We do what people like us – and people we like – do – use your testimonials, as many as you can get your hands on, which will provide people with the security that they’re making the right decision.

Talk to your Account Manager about your new-patient acquisition program. We can address all of the above points in your neighborhood newsletter and postcard to drive more new patients to call your practice. And, if you haven’t talked to your Account Manager about Phone Power Team Telephone Training to convert more calls – call us today – the program is a must for every dental practice and you’ll save $600 on your session when you book this week! And finally, blue is the favorite color – it creates the sensation of trust and security while red is a power color and great attention getter!  

– Gerald Zaltman, Harvard Business School